Biofashion Show Presents The Future Of Sustainability at London Design Festival

Biodesign Here Now opened last night to a captive audience of designers, architects, manufacturers and enthusiasts who were treated to the first edition of the Biodesign Fashion Show, held at Opencell London. Presenting accessories and clothing from designers and makers whose work is part of the exhibition from 19th-21st September, the show was a window into the materials and aesthetics of the near and far future.

Suzanne Lee at Open Cell, Biodesign Here Now Image: Fashnerd

Part of London Design Festival, this launch event and fashion show included a keynote from biomaterial and design veteran Suzanne Lee, who spoke about the impact this sector is having now, and what the future is likely to bring. Having spent well over a decade working on biomaterial and biodesign innovations at Biocouture, Modern Meadow, and now Biofabricate, she summed up the potential sustainable advantages of this sector, along with the significant challenges of scaling these new material solutions. The challenges include the vast amounts of funding and development time needed, which pose significant difficulties when seeking to meet the material needs of fast-moving industries like fashion.

Biofashion Show

In the fashion show following Lee’s keynote, designers presented bio-based accessories including biodegradable biopolymer flowers by Carolyn Raff developed from algae and agar, using rapidly renewable raw materials from the sea. Lina Nurk and Jonas Johansson’s vegan and biodegradable textiles were like an embroidered second skin, along with Silvio Tinello’s fungi bio agglomerate and bacterial cellulose bags. Rosie Broadhead is exploring embedding healthy bacteria into textiles for enhanced wellbeing through skin absorption and presented a bodysuit proof-of-concept. Denimaize is redesigning denim using wasted corn husks to extract the cellulose fibers, and spinning them with flax.

Monika Blaszczak, Biofashion Show Image: Lonesomesalone

Two designers created bio couture, presenting entire collections utilising hand-craft techniques driven by biological processes of lichen and mycelium growth. I have written about Piero D’Angelo’s prospective lichen fashion (article here) in the past, but last night D’Angelo presented his first entire collection, which proved a refreshing follow-up to London Fashion Week, which while commercial and brilliantly creative in many ways, isn’t proposing such radical ways to reimagine fashion for a future fraught with ecological fragility and scarcity of resources. His pieces were crafted delicately but the result was bold in terms of texture, colour, and structure.

Biodegradable biopolymer flowers by Carolyn Raff.

Biocouture

Aurelie Fontan uses scraps from the automotive and upholstery industries to repurpose and extend the life and visual interest of the materials, by exploring how they can be blended with mycelium. Still in its early stages, the majority of her collection showed dexterity with scraps that concealed the fact that these materials were less than perfect when she received them.

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Aurelie Fontan – Process.

Both Fontan and D’Angelo are residents of Open Cell, the biodesign lab with flexible and accessible space for experimentation to support designers, makers, and scientists as they tackle the challenges of developing sustainable solutions to our myriad of material problems.

Sustainability and Design

As the dialogue around climate change intensifies and we grow more anxious about finding solutions, the work of those on show at Biodesign Here Now offers optimism, inspiration, catalysis and hopefully scaling and adoption of the new solutions being presented. If you want to know what’s happening in Biodesign, and to see the edge of where materials are right now, with a view to what’s coming next, catch the exhibition from 19th-21st September at Open Cell, Shepherd’s Bush. See the programme of talks on 20th September here. Entry is free.

Bethany Williams’ Fashion is Sustainable From The Core

Bethany Williams’s London Fashion Week Mens presentation was set in the Charing Cross Library, forming the foundation of her brand’s seasonal message in the community mainstay of the local library.  Free to all for intellectual enrichment regardless of background or beliefs, the library set the perfect tone for the presentation of the SS19 collection entitled “No Address Needed to Join”.

   

The presentation unravelled as stories within stories to a soundtrack of The Gingerbread man audiobook.  The brand’s social and sustainability story was visually expressed through garments that appeared to have been crafted from sheets of compressed book pulp, cut into strips then hand-woven.  Comprising of half a dozen looks representative of a materials re-appropriation design language, the textile-led designs mixed materials rich in text, texture and colour – exuberant and bold – as you would expect from a collection with such a strong social message.

   

A true team effort, Bethany’s collections rely upon co-operation and collaboration, which must involve vast planning, negotiations and partnership agreements.  Her business model goes way beyond simply ordering fabrics from suppliers and working with garment manufacturers to sample and produce her collections.  This season Bethany and her team worked with The Quaker Mobile Library, which makes literature available for borrowing to marginalised members of society who have no fixed abode (who are unable to register for public library services) and British publishing house Hachette UK.  She obtained waste materials from Clay’s book manufacturing facility in Suffolk and took it to San Patrignano in Italy and worked alongside the community there to weave fabrics mixed from the book waste, waste from San Patrignano itself and donated pre-production waste from textile mills in Italy.

   

On the garment construction side, Bethany has continued the previous season’s partnership with the London College of Fashion’s ‘Making for Change’ programme, which supports the training of women in Downview Prison. Women on the programme will be constructing the jersey pieces for production orders of the collection. The production focuses on working closely with innovative rehabilitation programmes including San Patrignano, Making For Change at HMP Downview and Manx Workshop for the disabled (button production), providing skills and meaningful employment.

   

Making up a considerable portion of the collection were oversized hand-knitted jumpsuits, sweaters and trousers created in collaboration with Wool and Gang’s Heal the Wool yarn (made from 100% recycled Peruvian wool fibre with 30% of the yarn price donated to Friends of the Earth.  Recycled wool was sourced from Kent for the hand embroidery on the knitwear pieces. All the sampling was hand-knitted by Bethany’s mother on the Isle of Man where she grew up. Yarns were also sourced from Chris Carney Collections, a recycling and sorting facility, where knitwear is washed and unravelled before being hand-knitting into pieces for the collection. The denim elements within the collection were also sourced in the same manner and unpicked before being reconstituted and hand-printed into new garments.

   What transpires from this overview of the extensive collaborations and partnerships Bethany Williams forges is that sustainability is impressively integrated and fundamental to her brand, not a token afterthought or a simple matter of ordering organic or recycled materials for use in the collection – it is the very foundation of her creativity and modus operandi while celebrating inclusion, social mobility and community. 

Here, fashion is a vehicle for good with her inspiring roster of collaborators for the creation of her collections and their delivery, which was achieved through a presentation in collaboration with social and environmental activists and TIH Models, a niche, socially engaged modelling agency exclusively featuring individuals in unique living conditions.

Of course working at a ‘grass-roots’ level reclaiming and re-appropriating materials from waste can make for difficulties in ensuring required quantities for production and potentially in consistency of material quality.  The manual nature of many of the processes may also be challenging to scale up for larger production quantities.  Both these factors mean this is not a business model that can scale easily, but maybe that’s not the point here.  Speaking of fashion as a vehicle for positivity and change, Bethany Williams states “we provide an alternative system for fashion production, as we believe fashion’s reflection upon the world can create positive change.”  Job done. 

As part of this season’s community commitment, Bethany is donating 20% of the profits from this collection to The Quaker Mobile Library.  Bethany Williams is available now at 50m, Ecclestone Yard, London.

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Zahra ‘Sooty’ Hosseini’s Fashion and Sci-fi Inspired Call to Prayer

It’s not often that a fashion show stops you in your tracks, taking you away to an altogether more emotional and reflective place.  That’s what Zahra ‘Sooty’ Hosseini’s fashion performance, which opened the Royal College of Art MA show 2017, did.

Before attending the show I received an email warning me to arrive early due to extra bag checks in the wake of the recent London terrorist attack.  After delays and a very late start to the show as a result, Sooty’s fashion performance was an even more poignant opener, for it presented her adaptable modern ‘dress’ for muslim women via the medium of prayer, complete with the call to prayer, facing towards Mecca.

Rewinding a little, Sooty’s MA at the RCA has taken her on a two year journey of exploring her relationship with her culture (she hails from Manchester but her parents are Iranian), religion and faith.  Having grown up in an liberal environment, Sooty’s relationship with her faith has evolved naturally, without any pressure to pray or conform.  She explored clothing as an expression of her own individuality and a tendency to wrap jumpers into a headscarf or layer garments in geometric ways led Sooty to re-evaluate her sense of purpose as a designer.  Her journey is so personal as to involve direct input from young Muslim girls approaching her in the street to talk about her style, taking on ideas of interpreting dress to express personality, rather than simply having the function of covering the body.  Sooty is adding a layer of design to what has been led for so long by practicality and function, and has been devoid of innovation.  She recalls uninspiring shopping trips in her teenage years, when the limited offering of clothing instilled no individuality or opportunity for self-expression, except through customisation.  I sense that her style of dressing is an empowerment and declaration of ownership of her faith – even a celebration of it, which she explains can be so much more difficult if Islam has been adopted by obligation and not freely.  She feels this obligation is a breeding ground for rejection of the religion and culture, which she finds a great shame.

Inspired heavily by science-fiction and Islamic architecture and art, her aesthetic leans towards geometric pattern cutting and surface details, with widespread use of black with accents of green.  The inclusion of green came about on a recent trip to Iran, supported by the RCA, where Sooty had the opportunity to explore her culture and dig deeper into some research she had already begun involving Dr. Leonard Horowitz’s work on sound frequencies in the range of 440 to 528 Hz.  The temporary loss of her hearing in one ear last year prompted a deep exploration of sound and frequency and a ‘conscious meditation’ on the links between form, sound and emotion.  She shows me some research images of iron filings and magnets and Mecca during Hajj and draws interesting parallels in the formations within them.  She also mentions the formation of birds and the communication between animals at certain frequencies, then the sound of the union of prayer, which is repeated in unison and draws people together at the same time – creating a global frequency, if you like, that she interprets as having a power and effect that is not measurable by science, but is experienced physically and spiritually.

When we met at the RCA to conduct this interview and dig deeper into her motivation and vision for her collection, Sooty told me that she is driven by human connection and making people feel something in response to her work – bringing about emotion.  Her show certainly did that.  Suzy Menkes took to Instagram to commend Sooty for making a statement, Vogue featured images of the show, taking it somewhat into the mainstream, for which Sooty is visibly moved.

Instagram clip: Techstyler

All images: Zahra ‘Sooty’ Hosseini, except the three images immediately above, by Techstyler

I asked how the performance came about and Sooty explained that she had a vision for presenting an honest representation of Islam.  With the current media vilification of Islam and the misrepresentation of the faith (including demonising of the call to prayer by its use in police training scenarios of terrorist incidents in Manchester, for example), Sooty wanted to present the truth.  It is clear that the last two years have seen her explore her faith and carry out an open dialogue with Zowie Broach (MA course Leader) and she says it was the support of both Zowie and Tristan Webber that urged her to carry out what she sees as her role to present Islam in the light it deserves and give young Muslim girls an alternative to simple, uninspiring clothing.  Her entire collection of pieces is adaptable and made from squares – again drawing from geometry, and slashing and inserting zips to allow the wearer to change the styling and coverage, including openings at the hem to cover the feet during prayer.  She also created a dress which can be worn with its corners hooked in at the waist, or laid out as a prayer mat.  With this, Sooty is bringing design and even luxury, with her anatomically-placed quilted velvet for the hands, feet and knees when in the prayer position.  Her garments are fully adaptable to be worn on the street, or during prayer.

Images:  Zahra ‘Sooty’ Hosseini

When discussing the performance in more detail, Sooty explained that the casting was crucial.  She wanted to cast ‘hijabi girls who were short”.  A gorgeous outcome of the collection is that its proportions work best on girls of average height – or even better, those on the short side.  It’s a refreshing antidote to the typical western ideal of stretching everything and using ultra tall, thin models to create an ‘aspirational ideal’.  By using normal hijabi girls and transforming modest clothing through design and sci-fi inspiration, she has created another kind of aspiration.  The kind that is meaningful and enriching and that will make a contribution to the world.  “We don’t need more shit”, Sooty says, “the world is full of it”.  She is absolute in her mission to create designs and garments that have a real purpose.

 Images: Techstyler

The next step for Sooty is an exciting journey into business with her brother and sister, who export luxury goods from London to sell to the Iranian market.  They now plan to design a womenswear fashion range that is modern and aimed squarely at the market there and in the Middle East.  It’s not straightforward though, as she explains that it’s big, recognisable brand names that sell well to clients in the Middle East, not emerging ones.  She is pragmatic in the knowledge that some ‘western endorsement’ of her designs will be necessary at first, which is a point of frustration.

We wrap up our interview with a discussion about Sooty’s passion for sharing a positive message to young Muslim women and talk about her desire to engage in interviews, and perhaps even an ambassadorial role.  It’s hard to imagine a more inspiring and enlightening person for such a role – and she has that charming Mancunian accent on her side, too.

Watch Sooty’s edit of her final collection performance at the MA RCA fashion show here

Header image: Celine Antal

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SIBLING Plunders Lady Di and Babs Windsor for London Fashion Week Show

Community is a concept generating a huge amount of buzz in digital terms in the fashion and tech industries, where brands and businesses engage customers online and build loyalty with the aim of learning more about them and increasing commercial success.  Another kind of the community is the one that is built by a group of people with shared values, where a dialogue about politics, societal shifts and popular culture in, for example, their geographical location, takes place – where all subjects relevant to the community are on the table and action via collaboration, creativity and inclusion happens at a real life level.  Enter SIBLING.

SIBLING is more than a fashion brand – it’s a physical and digital community.  In fashion as in language, the word Sibling means brother, sister – family and unity – which is what Cozette McCreery and Sid Bryan, designers and heads of the SIBLING squad, represent.   They have an extended family around them and are deeply rooted in the arts, music and fashion scene that began in East London way before it became cool, and even longer before the term ‘hipster’ was born and became attached to their stomping ground.

A SIBLING show is an expression of this extended family and the core values of Cozette and Sid and of Britain.   This season it was expressed by way of nods to Lady Di‘s ruffled collars of the nineties, a hat ‘fit for Babs Windsor at a wedding’, London’s Pearly Kings and Queens and jazzed up football socks by way of bows.  Way beyond aesthetics and stylistic leanings it celebrates diversity and self-expression, embracing the enrichment of British culture by other cultures, including the work of Reggae’s ‘Mad Scientist’, Jamaican Lee Scratch Perry, before side-stepping to that most beloved British holiday destination, Spain (I’m sure Babs Windsor would approve) to grab silhouettes from Toreadors and Gaudi’s Trencadis mosaic techniques to add to the mix.

Top: Lady Diana (source unknown), Centre: London’s Pearly Kings and Queens (source unknown), Above: Lee Scratch Perry, GQ magazine

My passion for knitwear is clear via my design work and I couldn’t get through this article without mentioning the extremely complex process behind designing, developing and creating knitwear, the core of the SIBLING brand.  Knitwear is more complex to create than cut and sew woven and jersey garments as it involves designing and constructing the knitted textile, then creating the garment, as opposed to buying lengths of fabric for cut and sew techniques which bypass the textile design and creation processes altogether.  More complex, time consuming and expensive it may be, but it also allows for a bold and focussed vision, as represented in SIBLING’s use of colour and pattern.

As the current day brunette ‘Lady Di’ strode past I admired the metres of ruffles linked onto the knitted jackets and the lovingly designed details including lurex trims.  The increased time and scope of crafting two combined mens and womens collections rather than four separate collections per year looks to have allowed SIBLING the opportunity to explore print and weaving in addition to knitting, so the Trencadis concept extended beyond the knits to printed sweaters and trousers.

Their shoe collaboration with Freakloset uses their bespoke customisation system, rounding off my review with a foray towards digital design and how technology is shaping the fashion industry across all areas of the supply chain, from design to sales and delivery.

Sibling X Freakloset A/W 2017 Photo: Freakloset

This SIBLING show was a celebration of friendship, collaboration, British values of diversity and inclusion – something we need to shout about in this currently polarising political climate – and gives the audience an insight into what this ‘close-knit’ (sorry, couldn’t resist!) team stands for.  It is fun and moving and it transcends fashion.  Onwards and upwards #SIBLINGsquad

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Edda’s Illustrative Fancies Make for Fashion Week Fun

I wrote about the work of fashion designer Edda Gimnes on Techstyler back in February and was curious to see where her penchant for large, sweeping illustrated textiles had taken her for this season.  Edda is an emerging designer beginning to navigate her way into the fashion industry, grabbing onto opportunities arising from winning the bronze award at Designer’s Remix in Milan in March and Germany’s ‘Designer of Tomorrow‘ award in July, following the launch of her label EDDA at Fashion Scout  seven months ago during London Fashion Week.

Edda’s speciality is her celebration of ‘naive’ illustration (she draws with her non-dominant hand) and her willingness to be led into creative territory by mistakes and asymmetry in pattern cutting.  Most western-trained fashion graduates are schooled to strive for balance in pattern cutting, with a focus on fit and silhouette.  Edda’s patterns are a canvas – at times literally – for her fun and figurative broad-brush stroke designs which are digitally printed onto textiles.  The result is graphic, bold and a whole lot of fun.

screen-shot-2016-10-09-at-15-08-54 screen-shot-2016-10-09-at-15-07-18 screen-shot-2016-10-09-at-15-07-10screen-shot-2016-10-09-at-15-11-43screen-shot-2016-10-09-at-15-12-36screen-shot-2016-10-09-at-15-17-34Edda’s SS16 Illustrations, research and development

Winning the ‘Designer of Tomorrow’ award following her SS16 collection launch has earned Edda the tutelage of Alber Elbaz, commencing in 2017.  She will create collections in Germany and expand her practice and understanding of commerciality and manufacturing during the year-long award, supported by Peek and Cloppenburg.  I joined Edda to view her SS17 collection in East London, following her presentation at Fashion Scout during London Fashion Week.  She talked me through her ambitions to develop more wearable pieces in this collection and create structured dresses with softer prints to balance her signature graphics whilst maintaining the fun and naive construction and idiosyncratic details.  She peppered the new collection with colour and also introduced cute illustrated canvas handbags.

s02_0798s07_1115 s12_1998s06_0926s11_1669Edda SS17  Photos: Yoo Sun

I was especially drawn to the graphic prints in this collection.  Trying on Edda’s clothes transports me into a Quentin Blake-illustrated Roald Dahl-esque world, exciting my imagination and wrapping me in fantastical childhood memories.  Who wants to be a grown up anyway?

Edda SS17 London Fashion Week presentation

Edda and I discuss fashion magic and she wholeheartedly believes in keeping the spirit and fun in her designs from concept through to the final product.  Arguably, fashion is most successful when it offers familiarity and fantasy at the same time – there is something that feels right (nostalgic or familiar) and something new about it.  Edda’s creations deliver that.  They are so authentic – like a child’s frank honesty – and carry with them the designer’s charm, making the clothes highly personal for both her and the wearer.

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I’m placing a personal order and look forward to experiencing this feeling every time I wear one of Edda’s designs.  I also look forward to seeing the response it elicits from others.  After all, fashion is a language best celebrated in dialogue and Edda’s graphic stories are the perfect conversation starter.

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Fyodor Golan’s 3D Simulated Fashion Presentation Heralds The Symbiosis of Fashion Design and Tech

These are some of the words I frantically tapped into my iPhone notes during Fyodor Golan’s stunning London Fashion Week presentation: ‘tender, ferocious, glitchy, primal, diverse’.  The words hit me in digital waves, a helpful metaphor for a presentation that opened with a CGI film in collaboration with Miximaliste that cast avatar models hovering above water and interacting with each other in a tender and glitchy way, creating a warm and poetic narrative about nature, technology and design.  

This piece of CGI fashion film art, entitled ‘Change of Paradigm’ portrays a fantasy world described in the show notes as “an artificial FG paradise”, and is the first step in Fyodor Golan’s journey to fully digital design and specification of garments pre-sampling, removing the need to toile.  Ultimately, they would no longer sketch the designs and make a paper pattern and mock up a the garment in fabric – this would be done digitally – streamlining and speeding up their design and development process and allowing their creativity to run wild.  This new digital process will also enable Fyodor Golan to create seasonal experiences, testing the relationship between fashion, fantasy and reality.

Fyodor Golan X Miximaliste ‘Change of Paradigm’

The multicoloured avatars gave way to a live presentation of the SS17 collection on models packing a serious punch that left the marks primal, attitude and fearlessness in their wake.  This was an expression of the beauty of diversity as much as it was about fashion, technology and new presentation formats.  Fyodor Golan are pushing all sorts of boundaries – I viewed their presentation twice to take it all in.  A fashion journalist from the Czech Republic was enjoying his third viewing when we struck up a conversation.

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Amongst my aforementioned frantically typed notes I also wrote ‘so much direction here’, which, simplistic as it is, serves to remind me that the strength of vision in the film-making, use of colour, styling, casting, set design and sound made this presentation a force of fashion, technology and nature.  The collection is an extension of pre-SS17, which I wrote about previously on Techstyler, with its inspiration rooted in holographic pop star Hatsune Miku, making their avatar model concept a ‘natural’ extension of their pre-season inspiration.

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The hybrid hiking trainers by Salomon led me to imagine a place where these models might scale epic heights, conquering the next frontier of fashion tech and leading an intrepid journey forward into digital fashion’s future.  I can’t wait to see how Fyodor Golan bend tech to their will to present the next installation on their fashion tech journey.


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Golan Frydman, Fyodor Podgorny and a presentation guest, backstage

Show Credits

Stylist: Tati Cotliar

Collection Manager: Billie McKenna

Video Direction: Fyodor Golan

Video Animation: Thomas Makryniotis for Miximaliste

Show Production: NP+CO

Video Production: Miximaliste

Hair: Syd Hayes for Babyliss Pro

Makeup: Andrew Gallimore and Team @ CLM using Maybelline NY

Nails: Sabrina Gayle using Orly

Shoes: Salomon

Music Director: Rohan Budd

PR: Village

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Ashish Responds to Anti-Immigrant Sentiment by Celebrating his Indian Heritage at London Fashion Week

If fashion is a language, Ashish’s Spring Summer 17 collection at London Fashion Week spoke of multi-cultural defiance in reaction to the post-Brexit toxic anti-immigrant sentiment and violence reverberating throughout Britain and more broadly, much of the western world.  In this collection Ashish celebrated his Indian heritage and proudly declared immigrant status in Great Britain.

#LondonIsOpen was the closing mood, following a luscious procession of adorned Hindu-god-like models, men and women, swept along by an elegantly ambiguous sexuality, at least in this western context.

It was a celebration of craft and colour and a reminder that fashion is most powerful when it has something to say.  In the spirit of that, I’ll let Ashish’s SS17 collection do the talking.

Show credits:

Makeup: Isamaya Ffrench at Streeters with Maybelline

Hair:  Ali Pirzadeh and team at CLM Hair & Makeup (hair products by Toni and Guy)

Manicurist:  Michelle Humphrey and team at LMC for Nailsinc London

Set Design:  Thomas Petherick at CLM

Music:  Baluji Shrivastav OBE

Casting:  Troy Fearn and Mischa Notcutt at TM Casting

Animal Handler:  Andrew Stephenson at Zoolab

Press:  Village

“Special Thanks to my mum”

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Martine Jarlgaard’s Mixed Reality Show at London Fashion Week – A World First

Often looking inward (and perhaps gazing too much at it’s own toned, teenage-model navel),  fashion, for all the illusion of creativity and dynamism that it exudes to a captive public audience, is, in reality, largely conservative.  “I don’t see much innovation in fashion” says Martine Jarlgaard, ex-Vivienne Westwood Red Label Head Designer who has also designed for All Saints and Diesel.  It’s a broad professional backdrop from which she launched her brand Martine Jarlgaard London in 2014, and is presenting for the first time in an immersive ‘mixed reality’ experience on the official schedule at London Fashion Week in September 2016.

“I wanted to wait until I had a significant reason to present” said Martine, following a long discussion about the current state of the fashion industry and concerns about the environmental impact of mass production and waste in the garment manufacturing industry.  These are concerns that have been simmering for some time and a handful of emerging designers are tackling these issues head on.  Martine is one.  She is “disappointed with fashion” and feels a universal transparent system that untangles and delineates the supply chain and sourcing of materials is needed so that it is possible for brands and consumers to understand the impact of the materials being chosen and make informed decisions.  Many designers, for example, are not aware that some fabrics are created using devastatingly toxic chemicals that pollute and endanger workers and local populations.  Currently, this is not transparent.  She says it’s time for the fashion industry to be re-envisioned and re-defined and find the investment to create alternatives to the current polluting and wasteful processes. 

martine_jarlgaard_london_x_alcantara_x_njal_2016_07_04_0AlcantaraMaterialMartine Jarlgaard London AW15

As this article goes to print I read a piece by Richie Siegel about the expected future domination of Amazon Fashion, despite its current lack of curation and aesthetic appeal to fashion shoppers – a problem now being addressed.  Amazon’s pricing model is not based on large margins and sales discounting to shift stock like traditional fashion retailers.  Its margins are small, prices are keen and products are produced to fill gaps in the market – an already more ‘sustainable’ and pragmatic model – where a t-shirt costing £5 to produce is sold to consumers at around £6.50, in contrast to a traditional retailer who would squeeze suppliers down to a price of closer to £2 in order to sell to the consumer at £6.50.  Since Amazon would potentially sell tens of thousands of units (based on it’s market penetration and 65 million worldwide subscribers) it follows that if the products created by Amazon were sustainably and ethically produced it could trigger a big shift in the current polluting, inefficient, land-fill creating fast fashion sector.  Granted, this still may result in a lot of product eventually finding its way to land-fill, but the business model and the motivations are promising, especially if cleaner production methods are employed, and the customer is at the centre of this model.  For more information about calculating the cost of fast fashion, see my previous article Fashion Data: Calculating the cost of the fashion machine.

Martine is a curious and impassioned designer with a rich educational background (she gained a BA/MA at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen and did a stint at Rhode Island School of Design where she studied sculpture, artistic anatomy and anthropology amongst other broader fine art and design subjects, and has always worked in a cross-disciplinary manner.  She feels that the solutions and impetus for the change needed in the fashion industry to achieve a level of responsible, sustainable manufacturing will come from outside the industry and that technology will most likely find the solution.  Amazon is a technology company, and as mentioned above, looks set to disrupt fast fashion and provide some solutions to production excess and bloated inventories.    

Martine and I discuss current examples of big brands tackling sustainability and I mention the Nike Flyknit trainers, manufactured using a single knitting process creating the upper with minimal wastage – no leather tanning and sewing of component layers is required – and it can be manufactured anywhere in the world as it is machine driven.  This knitted upper began as a running shoe style and has now been used in a vast array of styles including the classic Air Force One and Nike Air Max.  Hershel have just released their ‘ApexKnit’ range of backpacks using the same knit technology and other product lines will surely follow.  Digital knitting provides a solution that creates superior design, comfort, wearability and sustainability.  Maybe that’s the key.  The sustainability looks like a bonus here, as the design and product performance is enhanced AND the product is sustainable.  It is also cheaper and easier to develop and iterate, therefore creating a far superior solution to the old leather, fabric and foam uppers made of many components requiring man power for stitching and assembly. 

af1m1 nike-flyknit-air-max-blue-lagoon-bright-crimson-01 Herschel-Supply-ApexKnit-CollectionTop: Nike Air Force One  –  Middle: Nike Air Max  – Above:  Herschel ApexKnit backpack

Martine mentions being inspired by Nike’s presentation at the Copenhagen Fashion Summit in which they explained the commercial and sustainable success of FlyKnit, achieved through technology and innovation.  Martine later clarifies that Nike displayed a rare level of honesty at the summit, expressing frustration with the slow pace of change towards sustainability in the fashion industry.  She happens to be wearing a pair of flyknit trainers during our interview, along with a gorgeous pinky, fleshy shimmering silk peaked slash neck blouse from her AW15 collection.

01 Martine Jarlgaard London AW15Martine Jarlgaard London AW15

We discuss luxury fashion in this context and when Martine mentions the apparent lack of desire for true innovation in this sector our discussion leads to a lack of cross-disciplinary teams in luxury fashion and a persistent uniformity and conservatism.  Where a team’s perspective is limited, perhaps the resulting creative expression through product is too.  It’s difficult to find varied perspectives on solutions to creative problems if every team member has a similar professional experience and background, which tends to be the case in the luxury fashion sector. 

Since launching her brand, Martine has used a combination of sustainable, recycled and surplus fabrics from luxury mills in Italy.  Her design philosophy is to create garments with a lifespan beyond one season, that are made to the highest quality, with a minimal aesthetic and an element of the unexpected.  She explores the tension between minimal and maximal so that her pieces have a personality and cites sculptural three dimensional creation of the garments as a driver for the silhouettes. 

b. Martine Jarlgaard London Drift Ice AW16 c. Martine Jarlgaard London Drift Ice AW16 d. Martine Jarlgaard London Drift Ice AW16Martine Jarlgaard London AW16

Martine’s SS17 collection will launch at London Fashion Week on September 17th with a mixed reality experience using Hololens, in collaboration with DoubleMe, who provide a novel 3D capture system, HoloPortal, that converts 2D videos into dynamic 3D models in real-time and supported by the Fashion Innovation AgencyHololens is a headset that projects a hologram in front of the wearer and allows them to interact with it by walking around it and moving nearer or farther, giving a truly immersive and personal experience dictated by the wearer. Martine’s collection will be presented via Hololens, meaning technically, it could be viewed by anyone in any location who possesses the headset, and physically in an accompanying garment presentation at the W Hotel London, marking the first ever holographic 3D mixed reality fashion ‘show’ for want of a more appropriate word.  So why this rather than a fashion show?  The fashion show format has barely changed since its inception in the early 1900’s and does not allow any kind of personal experience with the clothes – it is passive – as is much of the interaction in the way fashion is presented.  There is a lack of true engagement when sat at a distance viewing clothes zoom past on a runway and in a matter of minutes, the whole experience is over.  The format of a fashion show is also restrictive in that there is an intense build-up and planning and a huge team required to deliver a show to very tight deadlines within a remit that can curb the creativity of the designers and restrict the selection of garments shown, as outlined in a recent interview with London-based designers Fyodor Golan.  

Volvo-Cars-Microsoft-HoloLens-experience_01Microsoft Hololens – experimenting with car models in mixed reality

Martine found complete synergy with Hololens because it allows her to work across disciplines with their digital team and create a 3D experience befitting her sculptural design approach.  Here, the presentation format is symbiotic with her design approach and affords her the opportunity to showcase that and tell a story which can then be navigated from the viewer’s perspective, making another leap forward in our journey to the experiential as a form of fashion presentation.  Crucially, her buyers are “super-excited” about the presentation format.  Fashion is changing, albeit slowly, and it feels like Martine is at the foot of what will ultimately be the crest of an experiential fashion wave.  She plans to work with this technology for coming seasons, declaring that this is in no way a one-off, but rather the beginning of an exciting journey to differentiating her brand in an intelligent and meaningful way and raising awareness of her successful creation of sustainable luxury fashion.   

dune-london-diipa-khosla-15Online Influencer Diipa Khosla in Martine Jarlgaard London  at London Fashion Week

For details of Martine’s previous collaboration with Alcantara SpA click here 

Follow Martine on Twitter and Instagram

For information on first forays into fashion design using Hololens, click here

For a run down of fashion’s exploration of VR to date, read Emma Hope Allwood’s piece on Dazed Digital

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Fyodor Golan’s Pre-SS17 Collection Brings Grown-up fun and a catalyst for post-Brexit change

Fyodor Golan are somewhat of a paradox –  at once intellectual and playful, they traverse the fringe of a fashion industry in a state of flux.  Whilst contemplating the structure and aim of their fashion business, they are questioning the importance of individualism in a sea of rampantly ‘cohesive’ and highly refined fashion.  The designers open the interview with the revelation that they delayed their seasonal trip to their Paris showroom in order to vote in the referendum.  The fallout from the vote in favour of ‘Brexit’ has left them with a sense of resilience in the face of potential EU funding losses.  Many of the projects and initiatives they have undertaken whilst establishing and growing their business have been supported by EU funding and they predict a Darwinian ‘survival of the fittest’ situation will ensue amongst young independent fashion designers in London who are struggling to create seasonal collections and remain solvent.   

Where this dramatic and uncertain political climate could potentially trigger cautious conservatism, Fyodor and Golan are intellectually and pragmatically assessing all areas of their business and considering the needs of their customers and the best platforms with which to engage them.  They resolve to stay ‘individual’ and adopt an ever more digital and tech-driven approach to their seasonal collections.  Why do a show at London Fashion Week that draws vast energy and finance away from the business and requires the creation of some garments that they know will not be good sellers, but that are necessary in order to create requisite looks simply for the purposes of the show?  If the show is to the clear detriment of their product offering and bottom line, what is the point?  The vast press generated by a fashion show is well documented and, as any fashion designer involved in London, New York, Paris and Milan fashion weeks will tell you, the credibility gained from showing on-schedule during fashion week is immense and affirming – at least ostensibly.  But the rise of social media has taken fashion out of the hands of the few and placed it in the hands of the many global consumers.  Digital platforms have a life beyond a seven-odd minute fashion show during which time it is ‘impossible to see the clothes properly’ as noted by Fyodor.  In summary, fashion shows aren’t fit for purpose and the stigma attached to designers who decide to no longer ‘show’ is waning.

With new presentation platforms comes new opportunities for self-expression and consumer interaction.  Golan explains how insightful and inspiring the dialogue from client to designer is on Instagram.  Their clients post images of their self-styled ‘FG’ looks, thereby contextualising Fyodor and Golan’s seasonal work –  a dialogue that never occurred pre-social media when the only route to market was through wholesale accounts – meaning no direct contact between the designer and the consumer.  That’s all different now and brings me back to questioning the point of ‘cohesiveness’ of a fashion collection.

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The generally accepted framework for the study and application of fashion design that I, and many other designers have experienced at London/UK-based fashion design institutions, hinges on a refined, highly focused – ‘cohesive’ – presentation of a design concept/concepts in order to ensure that a specifiable ‘aesthetic’ is presented.  This occurs to me to be a useful tool for categorisation and identification of a designer or brand for the purposes of critique, but may be at odds with the way fashion is best presented, experienced and consumed in a digital age.

Burberry-Prorsum-Spring-Summer-2013-DECORCohesive uniformity – Burberry Prorsum SS13

Sure, brands like Burberry are built on a largely singular aesthetic/design language and their merchandising depends on a sort of ‘cohesion’, but what of the explosion of Vetements against the backdrop of such ‘cohesiveness’ and singularly focused vision – and what of the conversation about this collaborative, multi-faceted and un-cohesive aesthetic that is starting on social media (of course)?  Will cohesiveness and a singular aesthetic vision be relevant to millennials and Generation Z’ers?   If they’re shopping online and creating individual looks according to their own vision, and Instagram and Snapchat are ultimately more influential and engaging and more readily consumed than fashion shows, what is the point of cohesiveness at the expense of alienating consumers?  And again, if fashion shows continue to lose favour as the predominant presentation format, individuality becomes an even more powerful element of fashion’s presentation.  Fyodor Golan question this uniformity and go on to state that they have never sought ‘cohesiveness’ in their collections, but rather the creation of clothing as a vehicle for self expression and fun for their broad customer base, whose age group spans four decades and is global.  It could be argued that cohesiveness can kill creativity by stamping out individual expression, spontaneity and the charm of the unexpected – a fate unlikely to befall Fyodor Golan.

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On the subject of individualism in an increasingly ‘global’ market the duo explain, ‘Our clients come to us to express a different side of themselves… they have serious, professional jobs and wear Fyodor Golan as a way of tapping into their personality and as a visual representation of that (fun) side of themselves’. 


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Fyodor Golan’s creations are seriously fun.  Frothy?  Yes.  Flimsy?  Definitely not.  The products are underpinned by solid, quality-driven construction techniques employed since the launch of their label (which drew heavily on couture techniques initially) in 2011, and have evolved to express a sense of confidence through playfulness.

tumblr_mjul0m2iXs1s4mpljo3_1280Fyodor Golan SS2012

A further discussion that touches on current challenges in the area of fashion tech centres on product design versus fashion design.  Golan expresses the frustration at being restricted to short development times due to the seasonal nature of the fashion industry and longs to be able to explore design concepts in greater depth – as a product designer would, for example.  The approach through product design of creating a perfectly formed, functional and beautiful object is a luxury that just may be possible once Fyodor Golan have broken free of the restrictive cycle and demands that come with staging a fashion show each season.  Fyodor and Golan lament the unresolved design ideas that ping into their minds at that last evolutionary design stage – often the week before their London fashion week show – leaving them no time to see these ideas through to fruition because of limitations caused by show preparation and the restrictive need to create ‘looks’ for the show, rather than individually strong and exciting garments.  Due to the seasonal nature of fashion, the scope to pick up and continue such ideas in following seasons does not always present itself.  There is a serendipitous aspect to such ideas and sometimes, when the moment has passed, the opportunity and magic passes too. Essentially, dropping the traditional fashion show format allows the freedom and time to be more innovative.  It’s during this stage of the interview that Golan mentions the Makerversity, which is situated near their studio in Somerset House, which has clearly provided a point of reflection for the designers where the process of product design and development is concerned, versus that of fashion.

Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 18.34.49 Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 18.34.23Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 18.33.54 Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 18.34.05Fyodor Golan Pre-SS17

In their Pre-SS17 collection, Fyodor Golan have furthered explored a number of concepts initiated in their AW16 collection, including hybrid sportswear with strapping and bows that are silhouette-changing, rather than simply surface details.  This plays into their desire for individuality within the collection – so one garment has many guises depending on the wearer’s styling preferences.  The collection, entitled “Sakura Kawaii’ was inspired by Hatsune Miku – a hologram-generated pop star – resulting in a collection that expresses “romance through plastification”.  It’s surreal to see real live fans at the concert of a holographic pop star screaming and waving glow sticks, but it perfectly illustrates the blurring of lines between reality and artificiality that Fyodor Golan have distilled into this collection.

The animated look book is the perfect expression of this darkly psychedelic-samurai mood, in collaboration with digital artist and animator, Ignasi Monreal.   Part of the joy of Fyodor Golan’s look books is that they seek to excite the imagination, rather than simply sell, and it expresses an aesthetic that the designers describe as resolutely ‘digital’.

Fyodor Golan Pre-SS17

The digitally driven playfulness in the presentation of their Pre-SS17 collection causes me to speculate as to the format of their next fashion presentation for London Fashion Week in September.  ‘We’re still exploring options’ and ‘we’re looking at integrating the process of creation into the presentation’ were the official standpoints at the time of our interview – suffice to say it will be an exciting, experimental and likely experiential offering that will gloriously break with tradition in yet another refreshing Fyodor Golan chapter.  It’s an exciting time in an evolving industry where as many lessons come from Darwinian truth as they do from social media metrics.  If fashion’s future is about creative adaptation, dynamism, freedom of thought and individuality, Fyodor Golan are surging ahead.

Header image:  Fyodor Golan

Fyodor Golan lookbook credits:  Mark Rabadan (Photography), Tati Cotliar (Stylist), Ignasi Monreal (Animation), Michelle Webb (Make up), Johanna Cree Brown (Hair)

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Fashion Tech and Speculative Wearables in Imminent Space Travel

A recent visit to Ravensbourne has catalysed a shift in my opinion of ‘fashion tech’ as a discipline and led to an animated discussion around the reasons for the aesthetic gulf between fashion design and technology.  The reason for my visit was the European Space Agency initiative, ‘Couture in Orbit’ – a fashion show at the Science Museum in May, featuring the work of five fashion colleges in Europe: ESMOD Paris, ESMOD Berlin, Fashion Design Akademiet Copenhagen, Politecnico di Milano and Ravensbourne London, which set about planting creative seeds for what will become a necessity – fashion in space.  The colleges worked to a brief set by the ESA to present ideas and prototypes for fashion and accessories in the coming age of space travel.  In response to a number of nasty and aggressive comments on their YouTube page in response to a video of this initiative, the ESA wrote this:

Couture in Orbit is a student outreach project. The students are using materials and technology in their designs that are a spin-off from the space industry. Each school had a theme linked to an astronaut’s mission, such as environment, health, sustainability, and their final designs had to have practical benefits for life on Earth. No funds were exchanged and material and technical support was provided by Tech startups.

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Yes, the designs could be seen as somewhat ‘amateurish’ and ‘costumey’ in their concept and presentation and describing them as ‘couture’ and ‘fashion’ is not strictly accurate, however the idea here is key.  Fashion’s robust approach to design and creation of cohesive, refined collections does not allow for this kind of playful theatrics, but if fashion and tech are to advance there has to be some latitude where the end result is concerned. It makes no sense to judge this by the same standards as a show at London Fashion Week, for example, which exists for an entirely different purpose and is part of a totally different creative and commercial conversation.  The YouTube comments demonstrate an attitude that demeans the validity and power of fashion that I have seen previously hinder cooperation between fashion, science and tech sectors, but we will forge forward regardless.

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‘Couture in Orbit’ designs

‘It is inevitable’, said Ravensbourne students Farid Bin Karim and Sam Martin-Harper of the fusion of fashion and technology in clothing to come.  Their view was the same of space travel – we know for certain there will be inhabitation of other planets and commercial journeys to space, so we need to design clothing fit for space life.  The brief provided to the students by the ESA included an array of materials for them to use in their garments and accessories, including Sympatex, woven fabrics by Bionic Yarn and 37.5.  Being presented with a fixed set of materials is challenging from a design perspective, as fashion design often begins with selection of a fabrics to complement an aesthetic or theme held by the designer.  Removing this from the designer’s creative point of view throws up further challenges and provides experimental opportunities.  Karim leads me into a discussion about Design Fiction, a framework based on critical design which is the foundation of his speculative design approach on the Wearables MA course at Ravensbourne.  The modelling of future scenarios using design fiction provides a robust outline for predicting what fashion design could be in an age of commercial space travel, for example.  Karim selects three modes of technology – one that exists but he can’t access, one that exists that he can access and one that we can reasonably deduce will exist in the future – with which to begin to form a fashion tech product design scenario.  This Design Fiction framework and critical design, attributed to Julian Bleecker and Dunne and Raby respectively, and adopted widely in London as a modelling tool, begins to give me insight into how design for a future that we can’t yet imagine is conceivable and believable.

Farid explains that his self-closing helmet and kilt are inspired by sojourners travelling to space and creating their own exoplanet.  His concept hinged on the sojourners creating protective barriers around themselves that responded to atmospheric changes to give visual notifications allowing them to react and adapt.  His self-closing helmet is powered by muscle wires and his kilt, printed in collaboration with print designer and MA fashion student Laura Perry, has heat responsive ink which disappears at certain temperatures – a useful visual notification when things are hotting up.  Farid also used a UV responsive pigment – another useful visual alert.  Karim’s work is inspired by an array of creatives including artist Lucy McRae, writer HG Wells and movement artist and coder Nicola Plant.

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DSC02298Heat applied by the palm of the hand causes the ink to temporarily disappear

DSC02300UV source applied to printed fabric

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Farid Bin Karim’s self-closing helmet and reactive ink kilt, in collaboration with Laura Perry

Sam Martin-Harper presented an altogether more nostalgic proposition in which she expressed her belief (and hope) that we will always remain rooted to earth.  Her love of biology and particular interest in the techniques for growing plants on the International Space Station, including the work of astronaut Tim Peake, drove her to create a 3D printed neck piece containing plant life.  Admitting this is a conceptual piece, Sam explained how she used inspiration from the ingenious folding joint sections of space suits to inform the shapes and details of her design.  Sam is completing her BA and is still exploring career options.  One thing is for sure, she cannot see a future of fashion without the integration of tech.

IMG_1283DSC01973Sam Martin-Harper’s 3D printed plant-filled neckpiece at ‘Couture in Orbit”

A discussion on the future work of Farid centres on his passion for data as a tool for creating responsive and adaptive design.  He has been learning coding and electronics as part of his Wearables MA and sees future fashion as an extension of the individual – as ‘body centric’.  On graduation, Karim is hoping to work with a multi-disciplinary research facility to conduct collaborative research and design.  When I ask if he would consider a traditional design job (he is a fashion graduate, after all) he reflects on how he has had to unlearn and relearn aspects of his design approach through his Wearable MA training in order to realise his part industrial, part fashion creations.  It’s clear he’s happier in unchartered territory.

The discussion turned to couture and obsolescence.  Karim is curious about the possible inclusion of technology in couture techniques in order to aid their survival, but this is completely at odds with the fact that couture means made by hand.  This meaning of couture would therefore need to change for this to happen.  I ponder a possible alternative in the form of technologies so specialised, rare and unique that they create a techno-couture instead.  Here we begin to think about fashion and design being driven by technology, rather than the other way around.

In these discussions, as Alexa Pollmann, Course Leader of the MA Wearable Futures course, points out, it is important to consider the designs of Sam, Farid and the other students from Ravensbourne as proposals and prototypes – not final ‘fashion products’ per se.  Ask any fashion designer working in the industry today their opinion of fashion tech and they will overwhelmingly tell you that it is gimmicky, ugly and not desirable.  Herein lies the chasm between tech and fashion.  Looks really count, and so does magic.  Fashion designers bring an ephemeral quality to their creations, says Alexa.  Fashion designers dream up and articulate experiences better than any other design discipline.  They create magic in a way that is often so difficult to define it just feels ‘right’.  Fashion is entirely subjective and indisputably powerful.  For these reasons, Clive Van Heerden, co-founder of vHM Design Futures studio in London, which develops materials and technologies for a host of Wearable Electronic business propositions in the areas of electronic apparel, conductive textiles, physical gaming, medical monitoring and entertainment, insists on having a fashion designer in his creative team on all projects.

DSC02070DSC02181Designs by students from Politecnico di Milano

DSC02158Designs by students from Ravensbourne

But why are fashion designers resistant to incorporating tech into their designs and what is slowing down the advancement of the fashion tech fusion?  One factor is that the development of tech-enabled/collaborative products takes considerable research and development, and therefore time.  It requires dedication to solving specific problems related to firstly a single concept or product, which is at odds with designing, sampling and creating whole fashion collections which are visually cohesive within a strict time frame (weeks or months at most), which then have a finite sales period before the next collection is created (making the current one obsolete, for want of a better word) and the cycle continues.  The traditional cycle of two main collections per year for high end fashion labels has switched to four in recent years, meaning there is even less time for research and development.  Knowing this, it is easy to see why the work of fashion designers is at odds with the research and development required to incorporate tech, and vice versa.  In a previous interview with designers Fyodor Golan, they pointed out that fashion tech collaborations often have a required fixed outcome within a tight time frame, limiting the amount of integration possible.  This goes some way to explaining why sometimes fashion tech looks more ‘stuck on’ than cohesively and meaningfully designed and produced.

Read more about the technologies involved in the Couture in Orbit project here

Header image: Farid Bin Karim’s self-closing helmet and adaptable ink kilt at ‘Couture in Orbit’

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