Biofashion Show Presents The Future Of Sustainability at London Design Festival

Biodesign Here Now opened last night to a captive audience of designers, architects, manufacturers and enthusiasts who were treated to the first edition of the Biodesign Fashion Show, held at Opencell London. Presenting accessories and clothing from designers and makers whose work is part of the exhibition from 19th-21st September, the show was a window into the materials and aesthetics of the near and far future.

Suzanne Lee at Open Cell, Biodesign Here Now Image: Fashnerd

Part of London Design Festival, this launch event and fashion show included a keynote from biomaterial and design veteran Suzanne Lee, who spoke about the impact this sector is having now, and what the future is likely to bring. Having spent well over a decade working on biomaterial and biodesign innovations at Biocouture, Modern Meadow, and now Biofabricate, she summed up the potential sustainable advantages of this sector, along with the significant challenges of scaling these new material solutions. The challenges include the vast amounts of funding and development time needed, which pose significant difficulties when seeking to meet the material needs of fast-moving industries like fashion.

Biofashion Show

In the fashion show following Lee’s keynote, designers presented bio-based accessories including biodegradable biopolymer flowers by Carolyn Raff developed from algae and agar, using rapidly renewable raw materials from the sea. Lina Nurk and Jonas Johansson’s vegan and biodegradable textiles were like an embroidered second skin, along with Silvio Tinello’s fungi bio agglomerate and bacterial cellulose bags. Rosie Broadhead is exploring embedding healthy bacteria into textiles for enhanced wellbeing through skin absorption and presented a bodysuit proof-of-concept. Denimaize is redesigning denim using wasted corn husks to extract the cellulose fibers, and spinning them with flax.

Monika Blaszczak, Biofashion Show Image: Lonesomesalone

Two designers created bio couture, presenting entire collections utilising hand-craft techniques driven by biological processes of lichen and mycelium growth. I have written about Piero D’Angelo’s prospective lichen fashion (article here) in the past, but last night D’Angelo presented his first entire collection, which proved a refreshing follow-up to London Fashion Week, which while commercial and brilliantly creative in many ways, isn’t proposing such radical ways to reimagine fashion for a future fraught with ecological fragility and scarcity of resources. His pieces were crafted delicately but the result was bold in terms of texture, colour, and structure.

Biodegradable biopolymer flowers by Carolyn Raff.

Biocouture

Aurelie Fontan uses scraps from the automotive and upholstery industries to repurpose and extend the life and visual interest of the materials, by exploring how they can be blended with mycelium. Still in its early stages, the majority of her collection showed dexterity with scraps that concealed the fact that these materials were less than perfect when she received them.

Aurelie Fontan – Process.

Both Fontan and D’Angelo are residents of Open Cell, the biodesign lab with flexible and accessible space for experimentation to support designers, makers, and scientists as they tackle the challenges of developing sustainable solutions to our myriad of material problems.

Sustainability and Design

As the dialogue around climate change intensifies and we grow more anxious about finding solutions, the work of those on show at Biodesign Here Now offers optimism, inspiration, catalysis and hopefully scaling and adoption of the new solutions being presented. If you want to know what’s happening in Biodesign, and to see the edge of where materials are right now, with a view to what’s coming next, catch the exhibition from 19th-21st September at Open Cell, Shepherd’s Bush. See the programme of talks on 20th September here. Entry is free.

Superhuman – The Ravensbourne Postgraduate Show

Off the back of a frantic London Fashion Week I attended Superhuman, an exhibition of work by the MA and MSc graduates of Ravensbourne, spanning the degrees Communication Design, Interactive Products Features, Fashion, Wearable Futures, Applied Technologies (rapid prototyping and digital technologies), Interactive Digital Media, Moving Image and Environment Design.  The titles of these degrees alone fills me with wonder and optimism and gives anecdotal support to a claim I saw in a tangential teaser video by Future Hub, claiming that ‘40% of the top jobs in 2027 have not even been invented yet’, suggesting that the old educational silos and linear career paths of the past will not fit the bill of the future.  Step up Ravensbourne…

With the work of 29 graduates presented in a compact exhibition space it was a great deal to review and as such, my overview focuses on fashion and digital technologies.

Leaflet_Final

Farid Bin Karim is the first student to graduate from the MSc Wearable Futures degree and has created a body of written work entitled “Couturier and the Art of Survival: a Technologist’s Guide”.  This work is the result of Farid’s ambitious attempt to explore the appetite within the ‘closed-shop’ of couture for current and future technologies.

fer_4935fer_4938

His guide looks into the hypothetical future of the aesthetic embellishments of couture and the couturier in their struggle to remain relevant in an ever-changing and digital future.  Farid seeks to explain how technology can aid in this endeavour and affect the human perception of adornment as a wearable. It is an exploration in updating crafts and disciplines to add dimensionality for wearables of the future.

f1f4-copyf3f2

MSc Applied Technologies graduate Jason Taylor’s  project “The Bionic Toolkit” explores the idea of changing the way amputees interact with the design world by creating intuitive design tools.  It begins from the basis that the human hand has shaped the way we use traditional tools to design, meaning that such design tools are difficult to use with a prosthetic limb, as these devices are not kinematically accurate.

Taylor began by deconstructing an MRI scan of his own arm to create a 3D digital model. This model then served as a template in which myoelectric sensors, servos, and microprocessors were inserted and arranged so as to preserve kinematic function.  Using an open source robotic arm by InMoov (created by friend of Techstyler, Gael Langevin) for initial testing allowed Jason to explore how tools could be incorporated directly into the arm, reducing the need for sensors that would usually grip an existing tool.

Jason explained that “Rigorous testing has allowed me to explore the most efficient ways in which an amputee could draw, write, paint, sculpt etc… typically by attaching existing tools to each phalanx and recording the level of control, and ease of use. This allows for varying DOF’s (degree’s of freedom) depending upon the tool being used”.  “Using Ravensbourne’s state of the art prototyping facilities has allowed me to 3D print many iterations of mechanisms and prototypes, using a combination of FDM and polyjet 3D printers, laser cutters and 3D CNC machines.”

He plans to continue with the project now that he has graduated, and wishes to design more tools that amputees can attach to the Bionic Toolkit.  “The next step would be to make my project open source, so that other designers can freely edit my designs, and improve the quality of lives of others.” 

Update: 13/10/16 “The Bionic arm now allows the user to not only draw, sculpt, paint etc… but also to interact with digital environments (great for 3D modelling, VR and AR), sculpt dense materials (acting as a dremel-like tool), and 3D print direct from the ‘finger tips’.  Actions and movements can now also be recorded and repeated for iterative designs – lots of improvements since we last spoke!”

5 6 8 10

Siyue “Lulu” Xu’s designs propose that denim’s prevalent, cheap, fast fashion reputation can be reshaped by elevating denim design through craft.  The collection challenges the perceptions of environment-friendly fashion design and aims to show that smart design can both be aesthetically sleek and pleasing and at the same time reduce the rate of pollution from industrial manufacturing in a post-humanist future.

siyuexu-pg05dsiyuexu-pg05

Lulu prints, embroiders and enhances new and second-hand denim fabrics and garments, transforming them from ubiquitous items into rare collectibles.  Her re-worked denim seeks to challenge the polluting reputation that denim carries and is inspired by rebellion and anarchy, taking its manifesto from punk and 1980’s western club culture.  For more of Lulu’s work check out her collection book and Instagram antics.

siyuexu-pg05

n60a0102-21 n60a0102-2
siyuexu-pg05cdsc_0526dsc_1465

Zoe Alexandria Paton Burt’s work in progress is “Neither/Nor” (she is due to graduate from the MA fashion degree next year) and looks into the gender divide in clothing and how it perpetuates inequality amongst different genders.  She is seeking to highlight modern day use of language that is ingrained in western society that she feels undermines individual behavioural traits, expecting men to behave in ‘masculine’ and women in a ‘feminine’ ways.

Zoe’s collection synopsis goes on to explain that “the collection will encompass the use of 3D modelling and printing, textile manipulation, embroidery, a broad range of fabrics from the traditional to the techno”. The final outcomes will be a collection, fashion film and a documentary aiming to raise awareness of the fight for equality.

ZAPB PG04 DesignsZAPB PG04 Designs

The garments presented by Zoe under the name “Alexandria Paton” contain components that have been 3D scanned and modelled using Rhino, then realised with large format 3D printing.  Zoe is also experimenting with 3D printing directly onto fabric using the Ultimaker 2 and Faberdashery PLA. She prints on to both Velvet and PolyUrethane fabrics and plans to further experiment with 3D modelling and printing, incorporating traditional textile techniques to create a new and unique amalgamations of the two.  

ZAPB PG04 DesignsZAPB PG04 Designsscreen-shot-2016-10-08-at-22-17-03screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-22-16-23screen-shot-2016-10-08-at-22-15-53Zoe Burt’s garment prototyping, MA Fashion Degree in progress

For more information on the Ravensbourne MA/MSc graduate show visit superhuman2016.uk

More information on Ravensbourne courses can be found here.

Follow Techstyler on Instagram and Twitter

‘Prêt-a-Toucher’ – Inside A Very Special Fashion Archive

Fashion exhibitions are generally curated and presented is such a way as to distance the clothing from the viewer – a ‘do not touch’ rule applies.  It’s not hard to understand why, considering the need to preserve and protect the fabrics and construction.  However, it significantly limits our ability to understand the garments and to a degree forces us to see them only as aesthetic objects in static form.  So much about clothes is in the construction, underpinnings, drape, weight, linings and stitching – the heart, the soul – especially in couture, which is made entirely by hand.  You need to look inside to see it through the eyes of the craftsmen and women who made it.

The Temporary Fashion Museum at Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam allows just that.  With an exhibition presenting the archive of Eva Maria Hatschek, a Swiss woman who had an extraordinary collection of clothes designed, but (oddly in today’s terms) not made, by designers including Hubert de Givenchy, Coco Chanel and other couture masters of the 1940’s and beyond.

tmm_collected_by_1_foto_johannes_schwartzCollected by Eva Maria Hatschek – Image: Johannes Schwartz

Eva Maria Hatschek was a great appreciator of fabrics, colour and texture and from the 1960’s to 1980’s kept a diary of swatches, photographs and notes about outfits she would have designed by the great designers mentioned above then created by her own seamstresses, usually from Swiss textiles.  Incredibly, at that time (from the late 1940’s)  she would buy the paper patterns for the garments from the great designers and her staff would amend and cut them out and construct them in the fabric of her choosing.  She never threw anything away and the collection is comprised of 1700 pieces in total. 

DSC01403DSC01402

While discussing Mrs Hatschek’s collection with the museum staff they explained that it was unclear as to whether there were any limitations on the fabric selection imposed by the designers.  Given our current age of intense copyright and IP protection the selling of fashion house-created patterns to individuals to use at their will seems strangely open and relaxed, although it was very typical of that time.  Some of the fashion houses even provided labels for Mrs Hatschek to have sewn into the garments. 

DSC01367DSC01399

Eva Maria Hatschek not only wore custom made pieces by her seamstresses, but she had a vast collection of couture created by Yves Saint Laurent, Hubert de Givenchy and Coco Chanel.   Incredibly, Mrs Hatchek wore most pieces once only or not at all.  She was a true collector and appreciator of clothing for the sake of the beauty of the textiles, the techniques and craft, not ‘fashion’ as a notion of perpetual newness.  There were no fashion magazines found at her residence, only hundreds of archive boxes and her sketchbooks full of notes on the pieces she had bought and had made.

The fascinating exhibition is displayed as an industrial shelved archive and was made possible by the Swiss Textile Collection, which took custody of the immense collection (of which only one third is available to view in this exhibition) from Mrs Hatschek’s family after she died.  The Swiss Textile Collection wished for viewers to be able to interact with the textiles and understand the nature of the garments through close inspection and touch.  It’s a great privilege to be able to inspect in detail the work of such skilled crafts-people and understand the techniques of stitching and finishing they employed.

DSC01413

There is a beautiful ceremony around the process of viewing the pieces.  You are first presented with a catalogue, from which you can select garments/outfits to view.  The exhibition staff then locate the appropriate box in the open-shelved archive and once gloved, lay the garments out on tissue paper for the viewer to unfold and inspect.  I see a Chanel three-piece boucle suit which is archived as an ensemble with a silk shirt and matching scarf and boucle shawl.  The textiles are incredible and it is evident that the boucle’ yarn has been woven for the three piece suit, knitted for the shawl and crocheted for the shawl trim.  It shows a great understanding and exploration of textile techniques and creation of complimentary pieces – the same way a fashion designer might explore textiles within a collection and extend their use in different ways across different garments.  It is also a reminder of a historic way of dressing where an outfit was designed and created to be worn as a whole, without styling variation, in stark contrast to the contemporary way of dressing. 

DSC01396DSC01397DSC01368

The Chanel suit reveals inner markings on the waistband which are believed to be the signature of one of Mrs Hatschek’s seamstresses – a star-like motif that can be found on a number of garments.  It’s a hallmark of pride and craft and is a wonderful secret that would have been contained had these garments been exhibited in a traditional way on mannequins. 

DSC01375DSC01387DSC01394DSC01391DSC01398

Exclusive fashion made inclusive.  The way it should be and poignantly in line with fashion’s current digital evolution.

The exhibition entitled Collected by Eva Maria Hatschek runs until May 8th.  For further insight into the great fashion collector read the Instituut’s interview with Rosmarie Amacher of the Swiss Textile Collection.  

Header image by Johannes Schwartz

Follow me:  Twitter @Thetechstyler  and  Instagram @techstyler